Scott Martindaleby Scott Martindale
President, Sabrient Systems LLC

After an “investor’s paradise” year in 2017 – buoyed by ultra-low levels of volatility, inflation, and interest rates, and fueled even more by the promise of fiscal stimulus (which came to fruition by year end) – 2018 was quite different. First, it endured a long overdue correction in February that reminded investors that volatility is not dead, and the market wasn’t quite the same thereafter, as investors’ attention focused on escalating trade wars and central bank monetary tightening, leading to a defensive risk-off rotation mid-year and ultimately to new lows, a “technical bear market” (in the Nasdaq and Russell 2000), and the worst year for stocks since the 2008 financial crisis. Then, it was confronted with the Brexit negotiations falling apart, Italy on the verge of public debt default, violent “yellow vest” protests in France, key economies like China and Germany reporting contractionary economic data, and bellwether companies like FedEx (FDX) and Apple (AAPL) giving gloomy sales forecasts that reflect poorly on the state of the global economy. The list of obstacles seems endless.

Moreover, US stocks weren’t the only asset class to take a beating last year. International equities fared even worse. Bonds, oil and commodities, most systematic strategies, and even cryptocurrencies all took a hit. A perfect scenario for gold to flourish, right? Wrong, gold did poorly, too. There was simply nowhere to hide. Deutsche Bank noted that 93% of global financial markets had negative returns in 2018, the worst such performance in the 117-year history of its data set. It was a bad year for market beta, as diversification didn’t offer any help.

Not surprisingly, all of this has weighed heavily upon investor sentiment, even though the US economy, corporate earnings, and consumer sentiment have remained quite strong, with no recession in sight and given low inflation and interest rates. So, despite the generally positive fundamental outlook, investors in aggregate chose to take a defensive risk-off posture, ultimately leading to a massive selloff – accentuated by the rise of passive investing and the dominance of algorithmic trading – that did huge technical damage to the chart and crushed investor sentiment.

But fear not. There may be a silver lining to all of this, as it has created a superb buying opportunity, and it may finally spell a return to a more selective stock-picker’s market, with lower correlations and higher performance dispersion. Moreover, my expectation for 2019 is for a de-escalation in the trade war with China, a more accommodative Fed, and for higher stock prices ahead. Forward valuations overall have become exceedingly attractive, especially in the cyclical sectors that typically flourish in a growing economy.

In this periodic update, I provide a market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. In summary, our sector rankings remain bullish, while the sector rotation model remains in a defensive posture. Read on…

by Scott Martindale
President, Sabrient Systems LLC

Volatility suddenly returned with a vengeance last week – to both stocks and bonds. In fact, on Wednesday, while the -3.1% single-day selloff in the S&P 500 didn’t quite equal the -4.1% fall on February 3, the normal “flight to safety” into US Treasuries when stocks sell off didn’t occur, which was quite distressing to market participants and pundits alike. But on Thursday, bonds caught a bid while equities continued their fall. Suddenly, talk has become more serious about the potential for slower global growth due to rising interest rates and escalating trade wars.

But has anything really changed from a fundamental standpoint? I would say, absolutely not. Although the risk-off rotation since June 11 continues to hold back Sabrient’s cyclicals-oriented portfolios, our quantitative model still suggests that little has changed with the fundamentally strong outlook characterized by global economic growth, impressive US corporate earnings, modest inflation, low real interest rates, a stable global banking system, and historic fiscal stimulus in the US (including both tax relief and deregulation). Moreover, it appears to me that equities are severely oversold, and now is a good time to be accumulating high-quality stocks with attractive forward valuations from the cyclical sectors and small caps.

When a similar correction happened in February, the main culprits were inflation worries and hawkish rhetoric from the Federal Reserve regarding interest rates. After all, the so-called “Fed Put” has long supported the stock market. But then the Fed commentary became less hawkish and more data-driven, which was helpful given modest inflation data, but the start of the trade war rhetoric kept the market from bouncing back with as much gusto as it had been displaying.

So, what caused the correction this time? Well, to an extent, bipartisan support for heightened regulation and consumer privacy protections hit some of the mega-cap InfoTech stocks that had been leading the market. But in my view, the sudden spikes in fear (and the VIX) and in Treasury yields and the resulting rush to the exit in stocks was due to a combination of the Federal Reserve chairman’s suddenly hawkish rhetoric about interest rates and China’s extreme measures to offset damage from its trade war with the US.

In this periodic update, I provide a market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. In summary, our sector rankings remain bullish, while the sector rotation model has switched to a neutral posture due to the recent correction. Read on....

There is one quality which one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants, and a burning desire to possess it. -- Napoleon Hill

Wall Street seems to be feeling frisky lately, with major indices testing, poking and prodding record highs. And, in spite of the fact that the CBOE Volatility Index has been jolted back to life, the domestic economy seems to be exhibiting tendencies of slow, steady but solid growth.

But will Washington politics manage to upset Wall Street’s upbeat apple cart?

daniel / Tag: DJIA, SPX, COMP, PSP, KBE, KRE, IYG, XLF, ISM / 0 Comments

Do the difficult things while they are easy and do the great things while they are small. A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.”  -- Lao Tzu

Wall Street has been traveling in a tight line this past week, a classic tightrope walk between greed and fear. Investors seem unwilling to take profits off the table resulting from the year’s uptrend, not wishing to miss any of current Bull Run, but also appear reluctant to allocate more cash towards equities, at least for the moment.

daniel / Tag: DJIA, SPX, PSP, KBE, KRE, IYG, XLF, Finance Sector, Eurozone, Europe, Sequester, CBO / 0 Comments

david trainerBefore I delve into the accounting loopholes used to prop 3rd-quarter earnings, I will start with pointing out the intimidating amount of ETF choices in the financial sector.

There are 25 financial sector ETFs.  These 25 ETFs have drastically different stock holdings and, therefore, allocations. The lowest number of holdings is 24 while the highest is 496, per figure 1.

dtrainer / Tag: BAC, C, JPM, KBE, KBWP, VFH, XLF / 0 Comments

david trainerThe financial sector is one of four sectors to earn our “dangerous” rating and is the worst-ranked sector in the our 3Q11 Sector Roadmap report according to my methodology at New Constructs.

dtrainer / Tag: AFL, C, FAS, FXO, IAK, IAT, IYF, IYG, KBE, KBWP, KCE, KIE, KRE, KRU, MS, PFI, PIC, PJB, RWW, RYF, TRV, UYG, VFH, XLF / 0 Comments

10,000 Reasons to Hedge Your Bets

by Daniel Sckolnik of ETF Periscope

Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”  ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Though it’s not quite officially over, for all practical purposes it’s time to say goodbye to the dog days of summer.

daniel / Tag: FED, GLD, IYP, KBE, QTEC, S&P 500, USO / 0 Comments

Is VIX a Fix for What Ails You?

by Daniel Sckolnik of ETF Periscope

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.”   ~Albert Einstein

A whole lot of commotion, but not so much motion. It all depends on your perspective.

daniel / Tag: ETF, ETN, IWP, KBE, MFE, POT, QTEC, VIX, VIXX / 0 Comments

“To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect” ~ Lao Tzu

The markets are ready to dive off a cliff. Or maybe it just feels that way.

daniel / Tag: ETF, ETF-trading, IWP, KBE, KBW, PIIGS, QTEC, XOP / 0 Comments

"Prophecy is a good line of business, but it is full of risks."
--  Mark Twain

Back around 2000 years ago, the Greeks consulted the Delphic Oracle on
everything from important matters of public policy to personal affairs. The Oracle had a pretty decent reputation for seeing into the future, aided, no doubt, by the generous intake of hallucinogenic vapors she reputedly inhaled.

daniel / Tag: ETF, ETF-trading, exchange-traded-funds, IWP, KBE, QTEK, XOP / 0 Comments