Scott Martindale  by Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

As earnings season gets going, I believe we will see impressive reports reflecting stunning YOY growth in both top and bottom lines. According to Bloomberg, sell-side analysts' consensus YOY EPS growth estimate for the S&P 500 is north of 63% for Q2, 36% for full-year 2021, and 12% for 2022. But I still consider this to be somewhat conservative, with plenty of upside surprises likely. However, the market’s reaction to each earnings release will be more predicated on forward guidance, as investors are always forward-looking. To me, this is the bigger risk, but I am optimistic. Today’s lofty valuations are pricing in the expectation of both current “beats” and raised guidance, so as the speculative phase of the recovery moves into a more rational expansionary phase, I expect some multiple contraction such that further share price appreciation will depend upon companies “growing into” their valuations rather than through further multiple expansion, i.e., the earnings growth rate (through revenue growth, cost reduction, and rising productivity) will need to outpace the share price growth rate.

Despite the lofty valuations, investors seem to be betting on another blow-out quarter for earnings reports, along with increased forward guidance. On a technical basis, the market seems to be extended, with unfilled “gaps” on the chart. But while small caps, value stocks, cyclical sectors, and equal-weight indexes have pulled back significantly and consolidated gains since early June, the major indexes like S&P 500 and Nasdaq that are dominated by the mega caps haven’t wanted to correct very much. This appears to reinforce the notion that investors today see these juggernaut companies as defensive “safe havens.” So, while “reflation trade” market segments and the broader market in general have taken a 6-week risk-off breather from their torrid run and pulled back, Treasuries have caught a bid and the cap-weighted indexes have hit new highs as the big secular-growth mega-caps have been treated as a place to park money for relatively safe returns.

It also should be noted that the stock market has gone quite a long time without a significant correction, and I think such a correction could be in the cards at some point soon, perhaps to as low as 4,000 on the S&P 500, where there are some unfilled bullish gaps (at 4,020 and 3,973). However, if it happens, I would look at it as a long-term buying opportunity – and perhaps mark official transition to a stock-picker’s market.

The past several years created historic divergences in Value/Growth and Small/Large performance ratios with narrow market leadership. But after a COVID-selloff recovery rally, fueled by a $13.5 trillion increase in US household wealth in 2020 (compared to an $8.0 trillion decrease in 2008 during the Financial Crisis), that pushed abundant cheap capital into speculative market segments, SPACs, altcoins, NFTs, meme stocks, and other high-risk investments (or “mal-investments”), it appears that the divergences are converging, leadership is broadening, and Quality is ready for a comeback. A scary correction might be just the catalyst for the Quality factor to reassert itself. It also should allow for active selection, strategic beta, and equal weighting to thrive once again over the passive, cap-weighted indexes, which also would favor the cyclical sectors (Financial, Industrial, Materials, Energy) and high-quality dividend payers (e.g., “Dividend Aristocrats”). But I wouldn’t dismiss secular-growth Technology names that still sport relatively attractive valuations (Note: the new Q3 2021 Baker’s Dozen includes four such names).

In this periodic update, I provide a comprehensive market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals based SectorCast quant rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. To summarize, our sector rankings reflect a solidly bullish bias; the technicals picture has been strong for the cap-weighted major indexes but is looking like it is setting up for a significant (but buyable) correction; and our sector rotation model retains its bullish posture.

As a reminder, Sabrient’s newer portfolios – including Small Cap Growth, Dividend, Forward Looking Value (launched on 7/7/21), and the upcoming Q3 2021 Baker’s Dozen (launches on 7/20/21) – all reflect the process enhancements that we implemented in December 2019 in response to the unprecedented market distortions that created historic Value/Growth and Small/Large performance divergences. With a better balance between cyclical and secular growth and across market caps, most of our newer portfolios once again have shown solid performance relative to the benchmark (with some substantially outperforming) during quite a range of evolving market conditions. (Note: we post my latest presentation slide deck and Baker’s Dozen commentary on our public website.)  Read on….

Scott Martindale  by Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

Stocks are once again challenging all-time highs as the forward earnings estimates are being raised at an historically high rate in the wake of another impressive earnings season that blew away all consensus expectations. YTD through May, index total returns were strong across the board, including +12.7% for S&P 500, +6.6% for Nasdaq 100 (as mega-cap growth endured the brunt of the Value rotation), and +15.2% for Russell 2000 small caps. The strong earnings reports have given rise to further upgrades to forward sales and earnings from a highly cautious analyst community, many of whom are still concerned about COVID variants, supply chains, inflation, and Fed tapering, among many other worries.

Nevertheless, share prices have not gone up as fast as earnings, so valuations have receded a bit, with the S&P 500 falling from a forward P/E of 21.8x at the start of the year to 21.2x at the end of May (i.e., -2.8% versus a total return of +12.7%). Cyclicals in particular have seen this same trend, since they were largely bid up on speculation. For example, Energy (XLE) is up +39.2% YTD, but its forward P/E has fallen from 29.2x to 17.2x (-28.4%). With plenty of cash on the sidelines, many investors likely are holding back and hoping for a solid pullback rather than deploy cash at what may still appear to be elevated valuations and stretched technicals, as they move past a speculative investing mindset and into a more fundamentals and quality-oriented stage. While more speculative asset classes like SPACs and cryptocurrencies already have endured a pretty severe correction (driven by negative press or tweets from influential personalities), stocks really haven’t yet seen a healthy cleansing.

When the April YOY CPI reading came out on 5/12 at a surprisingly high +4.2%, stocks were expected to selloff hard, led by mega-cap growth stocks. But instead, they quickly gathered conviction and resumed their march higher. Small-cap value (which is dominated by cyclical sectors like Financial, Industrial, Materials, and Consumer Discretionary) in particular remains quite strong this year as the Value rotation continues in the face of an expansionary/recovery economic phase, unabated government support and largesse, and a continued productivity boom. And with GDP growth accelerating, particularly as the economy fully reopens and hobbled global supply chains are mended or rerouted, it is likely that the Street’s forward earnings estimates (even after the recent upgrades) are still too low, which means stocks should have more room to run without relying upon multiple expansion, in my view.

So, two questions seem to linger on everyone’s mind: 1) how might inflationary pressures impact economic growth and the stock market, and 2) are stock valuations overdone and at risk of a major correction? I tackle these questions in today’s post. In short, I believe earnings momentum should win out over overblown inflation worries and multiple contraction as we embark upon a multi-year boom (a “Roaring ‘20s” redux?) – but not without bouts of volatility.

With no clear path for runaway inflation and given the recent rotation out of the Growth factor, investors now seem to be adding exposure to both secular and cyclical growth – which is what my regular readers know I have been suggesting and what Sabrient’s GARP portfolios reflect (including our flagship Baker’s Dozen). As a reminder, you can go to http://bakersdozen.sabrient.com/bakers-dozen-marketing-materials to find my latest presentation slide deck and market commentary (which includes an update on the Q2 2020 Baker’s Dozen portfolio and an overview of the latest Q2 2021 Baker’s Dozen).

In this periodic update, I provide a comprehensive market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals based SectorCast quant rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. To summarize, our sector rankings reflect a solidly bullish bias, the technical picture is still long-term bullish (although in need of further near-term consolidation), and our sector rotation model retains its bullish posture. Read on….

Scott Martindale  by Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

After a strong Q1, stocks continue to rise on exuberant optimism, and the mega-cap dominated S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 just hit new highs this week. Notably, the Tech sector significantly lagged the broader market during the second half of Q1, primarily due to worries about the apparent spike in inflation and a surge in the 10-year Treasury yield (as a higher discount rate on future earnings has greater implications for longer duration growth stocks). But once the rapid rise in yield leveled off, Tech caught a bid once again. The Russell 2000 small cap index, after absolutely crushing all others from November through mid-March, has been cooling its jets for the past several weeks. I think the other indexes will need to do the same. In the short term, after going straight up over the past two weeks, the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 both look like they need to pause for some technical consolidation, but longer term look pretty darn good for solid upside – so long as earnings reports surprise solidly higher than the already strong predictions, and Q1 earnings season is now at hand.

Regular readers know I have been opining extensively about the bullish convergence of positive events including rapid vaccine rollout, reopening of the economy, massive fiscal and monetary stimulus/support, infrastructure spending, pent-up demand, strong revenue and earnings growth, and the start of a powerful and sustained recovery/expansionary economic phase – but with only a gradual rise in inflation and interest rates – in contrast with those who see the recent surge in inflation metrics and interest rates as the start of a continued escalation and perhaps impending disaster. Notably, in his annual letter to shareholders, JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon laid out a similar vision, referring to it as a “Goldilocks moment” leading to an economic boom that “could easily run into 2023.”

In my view, it was normal (and healthy) to see record low interest rates last summer given the economic shutdowns, and as the economy begins to reopen, interest rates are simply returning to pre-pandemic levels. Furthermore, relatively higher yields in the US attract global capital, and the Fed continues to pledge its support – indeed, I think it may even implement yield curve control (YCC) to help keep longer-term rates in check.

And as for inflation, the March CPI reading of 2.6% YOY sounds ominous, but it is mostly due to a low base period, i.e., falling prices at the depth of the pandemic selloff in March 2020, and this dynamic surely will continue over the coming months. Although we see pockets of inflation where there are production bottlenecks (e.g., from shutdowns or disrupted supply chains), it seems that massive stimulus has created asset inflation but little impact on aggregate demand and consumer prices, as personal savings rates remain high and the recent stimulus programs have mainly gone to paying bills, putting people back to work, and building up personal investment accounts. Future spending bills targeting infrastructure or green energy might have a greater impact, but for now, the huge supply of money in circulation is largely offset by disinflationary drivers like low velocity of money, aging demographics, re-globalization of trade and supply chains, and technological disruption. The Treasury market seems to be acknowledging this, as the rapid rise in the 10-year yield has leveled off at around 1.7%.

Thus, I believe that growth stocks, and in particular the Technology sector, must remain a part of every portfolio, even in this nascent expansionary economic phase that should be highly favorable to value and cyclical sectors like Industrial, Financial, Materials, and Energy. Put simply, new technologies from these Tech companies can facilitate other companies from all sectors to be more efficient, productive, and competitive. However, investors must be selective with those secular growth favorites that sport high P/E multiples as they likely will need to “grow into” their current valuations through old-fashioned earnings growth rather than through further multiple expansion, which may limit their upside.

And with Sabrient’s enhanced selection process, we believe our portfolios – including the Q1 2021 Baker’s Dozen that launched on 1/20/21, Small Cap Growth portfolio that launched on 3/15/21, Sabrient Dividend portfolio that launched on 3/19/21, and the upcoming Q2 2021 Baker’s Dozen that launches next week on 4/20/21 – are positioned for any growth scenario.

In this periodic update, I provide a comprehensive market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals based SectorCast quant rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. To summarize, our outlook is bullish (but with occasional bouts of volatility), our sector rankings reflect a solidly bullish bias, the technical picture is still long-term bullish (although in need of some near-term consolidation), and our sector rotation model retains its bullish posture.  Read on….

Scott Martindale  by Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

Investors have endured some unnerving gyrations in the stock market the past couple of weeks. Although the S&P 500 has fully recovered to achieve a new record high on Thursday at 3,960, the formerly high-flying Nasdaq is still 5% below its recent high. The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) has managed to remain below the 30 handle throughout the turbulence, where it has held since the end-of-January pullback. I have been saying regularly that I am bullish on equities but also expect to see occasional bouts of volatility, and this latest bout was driven by a sudden spike in Treasury yields (to above 1.6% on the 10-year!) due to tepid investor interest in the Treasury auctions and new inflation worries. However, Wednesday’s 10-year auction went just fine, boosting investor comfort. Obviously, a rapid rise in interest rates would wreak havoc on a heavily leveraged US economy, and it would hurt equity valuations versus bonds – especially long-duration growth stocks, which is why the high-flying Tech stocks have borne the brunt of the damage.

Nevertheless, optimism reigns given the explosive combination of rapid vaccine rollout, falling infection rates, new therapeutics (like monoclonal antibodies bamlanivimab and etesevimab), accelerated reopening of the economy, and the massive new fiscal stimulus package, coupled with the Fed’s promise not to tighten – in fact, the Fed may implement yield curve control (YCC) to balance its desire for rising inflation with limits on debt service costs. I see the recent pullback (or “correction” for the Nasdaq Composite) as exactly the sort of healthy wringing-out of speculative fervor that investors wish for (as a new buying opportunity) – but then often are afraid to act upon.

The “reflation trade” (in anticipation of higher real interest rates and inflation during an expansionary economic phase) would suggest overweighting cyclical sectors (Materials, Energy, Industrials, and Financials), small caps, commodities, emerging markets, and TIPS, as well as some attractively valued Technology and Healthcare stocks that offer disruptive technologies and strong growth trends. But investors must be more selective among the high-fliers that sport high P/E multiples as they likely will need to “grow into” their current valuations through old-fashioned earnings growth rather than through further multiple expansion, which may limit their upside. In addition, I think it is prudent to hedge against negative real interest rates and dollar devaluation by holding gold, gold miners, and cryptocurrencies. I elaborate on this below.

Regardless, with Sabrient’s enhanced stock selection process, we believe our portfolios – including the current Q1 2021 Baker’s Dozen that launched on 1/20/21, Small Cap Growth portfolio that launches on 3/15/21, Sabrient Dividend portfolio that launches on 3/19/21, and the Q2 2021 Baker’s Dozen that will launch next month on 4/20/21 – are better positioned for either: (a) continued broadening and rotation into value, cyclicals, and small/mid-caps, or (b) a return to the narrow leadership from secular growth that has been so prevalent for so long.

As a reminder, you can go to http://bakersdozen.sabrient.com/bakers-dozen-marketing-materials to find my latest presentation slide deck and market commentary (which includes an update on the Q1 2020 Baker’s Dozen portfolio that terminates next month), as well as a “talking points” sheet that describes each of the 13 stocks in the newest Q1 2021 portfolio.

I am particularly excited about our new portfolios because, whereas last year we were hopeful based on our testing that our enhanced portfolio selection process would provide better “all-weather” performance, this year we have seen solid evidence (over quite a range of market conditions!) that a better balance between secular and cyclical growth companies and across market caps – combined with a few stellar individual performers – has indeed provided significantly improved performance relative to the benchmark (as I discussed in my January article).

In this periodic update, I provide a comprehensive market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals based SectorCast quant rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. To summarize, our outlook is bullish (but with occasional bouts of volatility, as we have been experiencing), our sector rankings reflect a solidly bullish bias, the technical picture is mixed (neutral to bullish near-term and long-term, but bearish mid-term), and our sector rotation model retains its bullish posture. Read on….

Scott Martindale  by Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

First off, I am pleased to announce that Sabrient’s Q1 2021 Baker’s Dozen portfolio launched on January 20th! I am particularly excited because, whereas last year we were hopeful based on our testing that our enhanced portfolio selection process would provide better “all-weather” performance, this year we have seen solid evidence (over quite a range of market conditions!) that a better balance between secular and cyclical growth companies and across market caps has indeed provided significantly improved performance relative to the benchmark. Our secular-growth company selections have been notably strong, particularly during the periods of narrow Tech-driven leadership, and then later the cyclical, value, and smaller cap names carried the load as both investor optimism and market breadth expanded. I discuss the Baker’s Dozen model portfolio long-term performance history in greater detail in today’s post.

As a reminder, you can go to http://bakersdozen.sabrient.com/bakers-dozen-marketing-materials to find our “talking points” sheet that describes each of the 13 stocks in the new portfolio as well as my latest Baker’s Dozen presentation slide deck and commentary on the terminating portfolios (December 2019 and Q1 2020).

No doubt, 2020 was a challenging and often terrifying year. But it wasn’t all bad, especially for those who both stayed healthy and enjoyed the upper leg of the “K-shaped” recovery (in which some market segments like ecommerce/WFH thrived while other segments like travel/leisure were in a depression). In my case, although I dealt with a mild case of COVID-19 last June, I was able to spend way more time with my adult daughters than I previously thought would ever happen again, as they came to live with me and my wife for much of the year while working remotely. There’s always a silver lining.

With President Biden now officially in office, stock investors have not backed off the gas pedal at all.  And why would they when they see virtually unlimited global liquidity, including massive pro-cyclical fiscal and monetary stimulus that is likely to expand even further given Democrat control of the legislative triumvirate (President, House, and Senate) plus a dovish Fed Chair and Treasury nominee? In addition, investors see low interest rates, low inflation, effective vaccines and therapeutics being rolled out globally, pent-up consumer demand for travel and entertainment, huge cash balances on the sidelines (including $5 trillion in money market funds), imminent calming of international trade tensions, an expectation of big government spending programs, enhanced stimulus checks, a postponement in any new taxes or regulations (until the economy is on stronger footing), improving economic reports and corporate earnings outlooks, strong corporate balance sheets, and of course, an unflagging entrepreneurial spirit bringing the innovation, disruption, and productivity gains of rapidly advancing technologies.

Indeed, I continue to believe we are entering an expansionary economic phase that could run for at least the next few years, and investors should be positioned for both cyclical and secular growth. (Guggenheim CIO Scott Minerd said it might be a “golden age of prosperity.”) Moreover, I expect fundamental active selection, strategic beta ETFs, and equal weighting will outperform the cap-weighted passive indexes that have been so hard to beat over the past few years. If things play out as expected, this should be favorable for Sabrient’s enhanced growth-at-a-reasonable-price (aka GARP) approach, which combines value, growth, and quality factors. Although the large-cap, secular-growth stocks are not going away, their prices have already been bid up quite a bit, so the rotation into and outperformance of quality, value, cyclical-growth, and small-mid caps over pure growth, momentum, and minimum volatility factors since mid-May is likely to continue this year, as will a desire for high-quality dividend payers, in my view.

We also believe Healthcare will continue to be a leading sector in 2021 and beyond, given the rapid advancements in biomedical technology, diagnostics, genomics, precision medicine, medical devices, robotic surgery, and pharmaceutical development, much of which are enabled by 5G, AI, and 3D printing, not to mention expanding access, including affordable health plans and telehealth.

In this periodic update, I provide a comprehensive market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals-based SectorCast quant rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. To summarize, our outlook is bullish (although not without some bouts of volatility), the sector rankings reflect a moderately bullish bias, the longer-term technical picture remains strong (although it is near-term extended such that a pullback is likely), and our sector rotation model retains its bullish posture. Read on….

  Scott Martindaleby Scott Martindale
  President & CEO, Sabrient Systems LLC

As yet another decade comes to a close, the US continues to enjoy the longest economic expansion on record. And as if to put a cherry on top, the economic reports last week hardly could have been more encouraging for the New Year, propelling the S&P 500 index into its third major technical breakout since the recovery from the financial crisis began well over 10 years ago. In particular, the jobs report blew away estimates with 266,000 new jobs, the prior month’s report was revised upward, and the unemployment rate fell to a 50-year low of 3.5%. Importantly, those new jobs included 54,000 manufacturing jobs. Indeed, a growing view is that the manufacturing/industrial segment of the economy has bottomed out along with the corporate earnings recession and capital investment, with an economic upswing in the cards, which has been a key driver for the resurgence in value and cyclical stocks with solid fundamentals.

The good news kept coming, with the Consumer Sentiment report jumping back up to 99.2 (and averaging 97.0 over the past three years, which is the highest sustained level since the Clinton administration’s all-time highs), while wages are up 3.1% year-over-year, and household income is up 4.8% (to the highest levels in 20 years). And with capital rotating out of pricey bonds into riskier assets, it all seems to me to be more indicative of a recovery or expansionary phase of the economic cycle – which could go on for a few more years, given a continuation of current monetary and fiscal policies and a continued de-escalation in trade wars.  

To be sure, there have been plenty of major uncertainties hanging over the global economy, including a protracted trade war with China, an unresolved Brexit deal, an unsigned USMCA deal, and so on. And indeed, investors will want to see the December 15 trade deal deadline for new tariffs on China postponed. But suddenly, each of these seems to have a path to resolution, which gave a big boost to stocks today (Thursday). Moreover, a pervasive fear that we are in a “late-cycle” economy on the verge of recession was becoming more of a self-fulfilling prophesy than a fundamental reality, and now there is little doubt that investor sentiment is starting to ignore the fearmongers and move from risk-averse to risk-embracing, which better matches the fundamental outlook for the US economy and stocks, according to Sabrient’s model.

In this periodic update, I provide a detailed market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals based SectorCast rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. In summary, our sector rankings have turned bullish, while the longer-term technical picture remains bullish, and our sector rotation model also retains a solidly bullish posture.

By the way, you can find my latest slide deck and Baker’s Dozen commentary at http://bakersdozen.sabrient.com/bakers-dozen-marketing-materials, which provide details and graphics on two key developments:

  1. The bullish risk-on rotation since 8/27/19 is persisting, in which investors have shifted away from their previous defensive risk-off sentiment and back to a more optimistic risk-on preference that better aligns with the solid fundamental expectations of Wall Street analysts and Corporate America.
  1. We have developed and introduced a new Growth Quality Rank (GQR) as an enhancement to our growth-at-a-reasonable-price (aka GARP) model. It is intended to help provide better “all-weather” performance, even when investor sentiment seems “irrational.”  Read on….

Scott MartindaleStocks continue to trade in a sideways technical consolidation just below their highs. With the start of earnings season underway, investors appear to be looking for a catalyst for some renewed buying that can launch a bullish breakout.

smartindale / Tag: iShares, sectors, ETF, SPY, VIX, iyw, IYF, IYH, IYJ, IYC, IYK, IDU, IYZ, IYE, IYM, GM, JAZZ, GENT, BLK, FCNCA, SYNT, ADS, TDIV, FXO / 0 Comments

Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self confidence.” -- Robert Frost

Right now, it looks like it would take a major downside event to prevent the major indices from having a swimmingly good year.

daniel / Tag: SPX, DJIA, NASDAQ, COMP, VIX, VXX, KIE, FXO, XLF, IYF, VFH, volatility, CBOE, Fear Index / 0 Comments

An idea is a point of departure and no more. As soon as you elaborate, it becomes transformed by thought.” — Pablo Picasso

Last week saw investors exposed to a broad swath of noise from a number of diverse sources, and the bottom line was that Wall Street pretty much ended the week close to where it had begun.

daniel / Tag: SPX, DJIA, NASDAQ, COMP, KIE, FXO, IYF, XLF, VFH, FXI, China / 0 Comments

It was another week of wild mood-swings on Wall Street, as Ben Bernanke seemed to be intent on roiling the markets. Deliberate or not, the effect was the same, as investors seemed hesitant to jump in on the dips with the same enthusiasm that they have for the majority of the year so far. The question is, will the volatility express continue to barrel through the summer vacation months?

daniel / Tag: DJIA, COMP, SPX, VIX, VXX, KIE, FXO, IYF, XLF, VFH, volatility, FED, BERNANKE, fear gauge, Chicago Board Options Exchange / 0 Comments

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