Scott Martindaleby Scott Martindale
President, Sabrient Systems LLC

There is a stock market adage that says, “as goes January, so goes the year.” Well, if that comes true this year, we are in for some robust gains, as stocks just enjoyed the strongest January since 1987 (when it rose +13.2%). For the full month of January, the S&P 500 gained +8.0% (and S&P mid and small caps were even stronger at around +10.5%). Meanwhile, after a dismal 2H2018 in which Sabrient’s cyclicals-heavy portfolios trailed the broad market in the wake of a fear-driven defensive rotation that began in June, our 12 monthly all-cap Baker’s Dozen portfolios from 2018 handily outperformed by gaining an average of +11.8% for the full-month of January (and +19.7% since the low on Christmas Eve through 1/31, versus +15.2% for the SPY), and our actively-managed SMA portfolio (which holds 30 GARP stocks) gained +13.2%. Fundamentals seem to matter again, and institutional fund managers and corporate insiders have been suddenly scooping up shares of attractive-but-neglected companies in what they evidently see as a welcome buying opportunity.

On the other hand, it’s pretty clear to me that 4Q2018 was unnecessarily weak, with the ugliest December since the Great Depression, selling off to valuations that seem more reflective of an imminent global recession and Treasury yields of 5%. So, some might argue that January’s big rally was just a temporary bounce from massively oversold conditions – a case of “righting the ship” back to more appropriate valuations – and as such is giving us little indication about the balance of the year.

My view is more on the bullish side. When you combine earnings beats and stable or rising forward guidance with price declines, it sure seems to me that the worst is behind us, as investors recognize the opportunities before them and pay less attention to the gloomy news headlines and fearmongering commentators. Moreover, I expect to see a renewed appreciation for active management and a return to a more selective stock-picker’s market, with a rising stock market fueled by a de-escalation (or preliminary resolution) to the trade war with China and a more patient and accommodative Fed. In fact, as I said at the start of the year, I think the S&P 500 will finish the year with a gain in the 20-25% range – but savvy stock selection could produce even better returns. However, please be cognizant of 2018’s lesson that volatility is not dead, so try not to be alarmed when we encounter bouts of it over the course of the year.

In this periodic update, I provide a market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. In summary, our sector rankings remain slightly bullish, while the sector rotation model has returned to a neutral posture after a few months of defensiveness. Read on…

Scott Martindaleby Scott Martindale
President, Sabrient Systems LLC

After an “investor’s paradise” year in 2017 – buoyed by ultra-low levels of volatility, inflation, and interest rates, and fueled even more by the promise of fiscal stimulus (which came to fruition by year end) – 2018 was quite different. First, it endured a long overdue correction in February that reminded investors that volatility is not dead, and the market wasn’t quite the same thereafter, as investors’ attention focused on escalating trade wars and central bank monetary tightening, leading to a defensive risk-off rotation mid-year and ultimately to new lows, a “technical bear market” (in the Nasdaq and Russell 2000), and the worst year for stocks since the 2008 financial crisis. Then, it was confronted with the Brexit negotiations falling apart, Italy on the verge of public debt default, violent “yellow vest” protests in France, key economies like China and Germany reporting contractionary economic data, and bellwether companies like FedEx (FDX) and Apple (AAPL) giving gloomy sales forecasts that reflect poorly on the state of the global economy. The list of obstacles seems endless.

Moreover, US stocks weren’t the only asset class to take a beating last year. International equities fared even worse. Bonds, oil and commodities, most systematic strategies, and even cryptocurrencies all took a hit. A perfect scenario for gold to flourish, right? Wrong, gold did poorly, too. There was simply nowhere to hide. Deutsche Bank noted that 93% of global financial markets had negative returns in 2018, the worst such performance in the 117-year history of its data set. It was a bad year for market beta, as diversification didn’t offer any help.

Not surprisingly, all of this has weighed heavily upon investor sentiment, even though the US economy, corporate earnings, and consumer sentiment have remained quite strong, with no recession in sight and given low inflation and interest rates. So, despite the generally positive fundamental outlook, investors in aggregate chose to take a defensive risk-off posture, ultimately leading to a massive selloff – accentuated by the rise of passive investing and the dominance of algorithmic trading – that did huge technical damage to the chart and crushed investor sentiment.

But fear not. There may be a silver lining to all of this, as it has created a superb buying opportunity, and it may finally spell a return to a more selective stock-picker’s market, with lower correlations and higher performance dispersion. Moreover, my expectation for 2019 is for a de-escalation in the trade war with China, a more accommodative Fed, and for higher stock prices ahead. Forward valuations overall have become exceedingly attractive, especially in the cyclical sectors that typically flourish in a growing economy.

In this periodic update, I provide a market commentary, offer my technical analysis of the S&P 500, review Sabrient’s latest fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten US business sectors, and serve up some actionable ETF trading ideas. In summary, our sector rankings remain bullish, while the sector rotation model remains in a defensive posture. Read on…